Monday, January 7, 2013

Tangzhong Whole Wheat & Rye Bread

Tangzhong Whole Wheat & Rye Bread

Doesn't this bread look like three little alien faces? Or Angry Birds?

About six months ago, I posted about baking Hokkaido Milk Bread using a Tangzhong. Since then, many of you have asked about a whole wheat version of this bread.

Tangzhong is a mixture of water and flour that is cooked to 64 degrees C/149 degrees F. For one explanation of how it works, I recommend reading this post. Or... it could just be magic. (The writer also discusses how to incorporate using a bread machine to make this dough.) Regardless, this method produces a very soft and fluffy bread that has great shelf life.

I've also received requests for a clearer explanation on how to shape this bread. I've taken some photos of the process, which I will post here, but I thought I'd show you the diagram I made and upon which I rely to shape my loaves. I'm sure any confusion will be cleared up after this..... not.... Here you go....


Hope you enjoyed. We all have different learning styles. I promise, I will include some "real life" photos below. All I know is that the oven rise was amazing. Freakishly so.



Tangzhong Whole Wheat & Rye Bread

Ingredients


Tangzhong


30 g bread flour
150 g water

Final Dough


200 g bread flour
75 g whole wheat flour
75 g dark rye flour
5 g instant yeast
55 g light brown sugar
5 g salt
125 g whole milk, heated to 95 to 100 degrees F
120 g of the tangzhong
1 egg
30 g very soft butter


Instructions

  • Prepare the tangzhong by whisking the water and the flour together in a sauce pan over low heat. Constantly stir the mixture until the it reaches 149 degrees F. It should thicken and resemble a roux. Using an instant read thermometer is really helpful. 
  • Move the mixture to a bowl and let the tangzhong cool completely.
  • Whisk the bread, wheat, and rye flours in the bowl of a stand mixer (you can also use a bread machine to make the dough).
  • Add the yeast, brown sugar, and salt and whisk.
  • Add the milk, tangzhong, and the egg and mix with a spoon or a dough whisk to blend. 
  • Add the butter and knead with the dough hook for 15 to 20 minutes. You might need to stop and scrape down the bowl a few times before the dough hook can really work the dough. 
  • You will know when the dough is ready when you tear off a small piece and can stretch it into a thin membrane. 
  • Place the dough in a greased bowl or dough rising bucket, cover it, and allow the dough to double. It took about two hours in my case.
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and degas the dough.
  • Divide the dough into 3 pieces. 

  • Form each ball into a rectangle and fold the long ends of the rectangle over each other like an envelope.

  • With a rolling pin, roll the dough the long way into another long rectangle. 

  • Roll up the three rectangles and place them seam side down into a one pound (8 1/2 inch by 4 1/2 inch) loaf pan.

  • Cover the loaf with plastic wrap and let rise until it reaches the top of the loaf pan (or just under the top). This took 40 minutes for me. 
  • Brush the loaf with milk, egg, or the rest of the tangzhong, and bake for about 35 minutes, until the bread is golden brown.
  • De-pan and cool completely on a cooling rack. 


Had a great turkey BLT with this bread today.

Sharing with Bake Your Own Bread hosted by Roxana.
Sharing with Yeastspotting.

Adapted from My Custard Pie

5 comments:

  1. this year I'm definitely going to conquer the Tangzhong technique. Your bread is gorgeous Karen
    Thanks for bringing it to #bakeyourownbread

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think I'm gonna vote for the aliens! ;) It looks so cool! And really yummy too!

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  3. Wow, it's great that it works for WW bread as well. I used the TZ method once with white bread. I have to put this WW version on my todo list. Thanks for sharing the recipe and the drawn illustrations. It helps :o)

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  4. I love the TZ method. I made my first buns with it yesterday and I'm hooked. I can't wait to try it with whole wheat recipes. I was a little skeptical about how well it would work with whole wheat, but you've convinced me.

    ReplyDelete

I love comments and questions and read every one of them.