Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Pizza di Pasqua - Easter Pizza for #TwelveLoaves

Pizza di Pasqua - Karen's Kitchen Stories

This Pizza di Pasqua is traditionally served only on Easter morning in areas of central Italy (at least according to the interwebs). It is incredibly ethereal and light. In fact, as I researched this bread, I was continuously reminded that "this bread is very delicate." (With all of those warnings, I was a little nervous after my "collapsed savarin incident" that I'm trying to forget).

Pizza you ask? I know!! Pizza in Italy is not just the flatbread that we know and love.

This bread is almost like a cake, yet leavened by yeast. It looks like a tall domed panettone, but is much more airy and delicate and is faintly flavored with oranges and lemons.

Pizza di Pasqua - Karen's Kitchen Stories

It makes simply amazing French toast. Trust me.
Pizza di Pasqua - Karen's Kitchen Stories


The citrusy flavor in these loaves comes from the zest of 3 oranges and two lemons. Check out the lovely flecks of zest in this delicate slice!

Pizza di Pasqua - Karen's Kitchen Stories

Unless you have a very strong arm and a lot of stamina, you will need a stand mixer to make this dough. Even though the final bread is very cake-like, it requires a long beating time to develop the gluten so that the dough does not collapse. As I was reminded over and over again, "this bread is very delicate." You will notice this when you stir down the dough after the first rise. It just goes pffft.

One issue was that the top of the bread blackened very quickly. Next time, I will lower the oven temperature and tent the tops of the loaves with foil earlier to prevent this.

Do you love citrus? Do you love all things Italian? Do you love a delicate airy lightly sweetened bread? Give this one a try. Don't let the 10 egg yolks discourage you. You can always make meringue or macarons from the egg whites, right?

Pizza di Pasqua - Karen's Kitchen Stories

#TwelveLoaves April: Oranges. The month of March was filled with gorgeous strawberry breads! We have chosen ORANGES for our April theme! Choose a recipe including oranges. Your bread of choice recipe must include in the recipe: oranges, orange marmalade, orange zest. In addition to being in the dough, it could also be added to a glaze. Whatever you bake, (yeasted, quick bread, crackers, muffins, braids, flatbreads, etc) have fun and let's have a delicious month of bread with ORANGES.  Let's get baking!
If you’d like to add your bread to the collection with the Linky Tool this month, here’s what you need to do!
1. When you post your Twelve Loaves bread on your blog, make sure that you mention the Twelve Loaves challenge in your blog post; this helps us to get more members as well as share everyone's posts. Please make sure that your bread is inspired by the theme!
2. Please link your post to the linky tool at the bottom of my blog. It must be a bread baked to the Twelve Loaves theme.
3. Have your Twelve Loaves bread that you baked this April, 2014, and posted on your blog by April 30, 2014.
#TwelveLoaves is a monthly bread baking party created by Lora from Cake Duchess. #TwelveLoaves runs so smoothly thanks to the help of the lovely Renee from Magnolia Days and Heather from girlichef.

Let's see what all of our Twelve Loaves bakers baked with oranges this month:


Pizza di Pasqua

Sponge

3 tsp instant yeast (I used SAF Gold)
1/2 C warm water
70 g (1/2 C) bread flour

Mix the sponge in the bowl of a stand mixer, cover with plastic wrap, and let sit for 60 minutes, until bubbly. 

Final Dough

450 g (3 1/4 C) bread flour
10 large egg yolks
125 g (1/2 C plus 2 T) granulated sugar
1/2 C milk
zest from 3 oranges
zest from 2 lemons
1 1/2 tsp vanilla
1 tsp salt
1/2 C plus 1 T unsalted butter at room temperature

  1. Add the flour to the sponge and beat with the paddle attachment for about a minute. 
  2. Beat the egg yolks into the dough, one at a time.
  3. Add the sugar, and beat until incorporated. 
  4. Add milk and beat until incorporated. 
  5. Add the zests, the vanilla, the salt, and mix.
  6. While beating on medium, add the butter, 2 tablespoons at a time. 
  7. Once the butter is incorporated, beat the dough on medium high for 10 minutes, until you have developed a very elastic dough. 
  8. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and allow the dough to rise until very puffy and nearly tripled in size, 1 to 3 hours, so watch closely. 
  9. Stir down the dough and pour it into two 2-quart baking pans such as panettone molds or souffle dishes. High sided metal cake pans will also work. Do not worry about trying to actually shape the dough. 
  10. Cover each pan with oiled plastic wrap and allow to rise until doubled. If you are using panettone molds, place them on a baking sheet. 
  11. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. 
  12. When the loaves are ready, place them in the oven. After 10 minutes, reduce the oven heat to 325 degrees F. Watch the loaves closely and tent with foil if they darken too quickly. 
  13. Bake for another 25 to 30 minutes, until done. 
  14. Let the loaves cool in the pans. 
Sharing with Yeastspotting




27 comments:

  1. Whoa, ten yolks! That is one rich, yet light and fluffy bread, Karen. I can imagine it makes wonderful French toast and possibly even better bread pudding.

    And my answers are yes and yes and yes!

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    1. Thanks Stacy. I still can't believe I was able to separate all of those eggs!

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  2. This is so beautiful, Karen - and with that gorgeous color from the yolks, I find it utterly irresistible. Yum.I echo Stacy's triple-yes ;).

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  3. What a magnificent Easter loaf! I'd love this on my holiday table!

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  4. Okay now, where has this bread been all my life? Wow! It looks so light and airy. Fabulous recipe and thank you so much for sharing it for Twelve Loaves.

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    1. Thanks Renee! I just discovered it myself =)

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  5. I absolutely want that on my Easter table, and then I want a Pavlova that uses all the whites, for dessert! Nice baking with you this month for #TwelveLoaves!

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    1. Oooh great idea on the Pavlova Dorothy! =)

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  6. You always come up with such beautiful breads Karen, I don't know how you manage it. Your bread looks absolutely lovely and the crumb is so light and airy..wonderful job!

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    1. You are so sweet. Big smile on my face right now.

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  7. I love this bread! Zest from 3 oranges and two lemons??!!! Wow, I bet this tasted fabulous!!! it reminds me of the texture you'd get from a brioche? looks so good!!!

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    1. Thanks Alice. It was much airier than brioche, and a bit sweeter. I think it's because it has a much higher hydration level.

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  8. Wow, what extraordinary looking bread - I know I would absolutely adore this, especially turned into French toast!

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  9. What a beautiful loaf, and right in time for Easter. Thanks for all of the tips for making it as I am sure I would have thought I ruined it if deflated like that after the first rise. I am looking forward to trying it, and possibly making some french toast out of it if there are any leftovers.

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    1. It was kind of scary. The original recipe calls for brushing the tops with egg, but I did not dare try that!

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  10. Oh, it looks SO wonderful and I love your suggestion of using it for French toast!

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  11. Will you bake me one for Easter, Karen? LOVE this incredible bread. All the richness from the yolks and butter, just amazing! Thank you for sharing with #TwelveLoaves this month!!

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  12. Yes I love Italian food and yes I love citrus...and yes I wish I lived near you to sample this bread. I can't imagine anything so rich and beautiful coming out of my oven-- this is a masterpiece!

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  13. Italian bread are my favorite, they are so rich and taste yum!

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  14. Wow, this bread sounds delicious, love all the citrus.

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I love comments and questions and read every one of them.