Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Singapore Noodles | Wok Wednesdays


The recipe for these Singapore Noodles is from Stir Frying to the Sky's Edge for Wok Wednesdays, and it was amazingly tasty. Even Mr. Kitchen, who tends to be annoyed with my wok adventures loved it.



Even so, the dish was difficult to photograph because:
  1. It's full of curry, which makes everything look yellow. 
  2. I still need to learn Lightroom and Photoshop. Someone, please kick me in the butt and make me do it. 
Regardless, this dish was amazing. You are going to have to trust me on this. 

One of my favorite parts of this recipe is the Chinese barbecued pork. It is simply one of the most amazing and delicious meats ever. Check out this post for photos of the pork, post broiling. 

This recipe called for just 4 ounces of the pork, but I made 2 pounds of it and it did not last very long in this house. Getting the book for just this recipe is well worth the price. 

This recipe calls for thin rice stick noodles. The hardest part in working with them is they tend to clump up while you are stir frying and all of the extra ingredients hang around the sides of the wok. While long noodles signify long life in Chinese culture, cutting the noodles into 6 inch strands after soaking them is really helpful in preparing this dish. 

As a member of Wok Wednesdays, I can't publish the specifics of the recipe for this dish (get the book, you won't regret it), here's what I did differently:
  1. The recipe calls for 4 ounces of small shrimp. I used 16 ounces of large shrimp. 
  2. Instead of using Madras curry, I used regular curry and added 1/8 tsp of cayenne pepper. 
  3. I also substituted some red bell pepper for some of the green bell pepper, mostly because I had it on hand. 
The key ingredients are rice noodles, chicken broth, soy, rice wine, garlic, ginger, shrimp, bell peppers, curry, Chinese barbecued pork, and scallions. The key takeaway? Amazing. 

Once you've softened the noodles in water, you cut them into 6 to 8 inch strands. You cook the shrimp with the garlic and ginger, then cook the noodles in the curry along with the vegetables. Then you combine everything together (and add the amazing pork). Crazy good. 

We served this alongside the leftover barbecued pork and some steamed sugar snaps. We had plenty of leftovers for lunch the next day. 

8 comments:

  1. One of my favorite noodles! Though I never tried making myself.. definitely worth trying!

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  2. Absolutely beautiful, Karen! Now that the weather has cooled, I'm hoping to get this made soon. Mr. Kitchen gets annoyed? How dare he... I hear you about the photo process - I have no patience to learn how all that works. Would be nice to know though.

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    1. Thanks so much! I do need to take a class to force me to learn the software. It would be so nice to know!

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  3. Karen, I got this cookbook but haven't even looked at it yet.... busy busy busy. I will search for the barbecued pork recipe right away (that probably means this weekend)

    I also commit the sin of cutting noodles shorter... I know, we are bad! ;-)

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    1. Thanks Sally =) You will just love the pork. Seriously!

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  4. Hi Karen, love these kinds of meals. How interesting about noodles and long life in the Chinese culture. Will be making this soon. PInned.

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    1. Definitely get the book. It's like getting a Ph.D in wokking.

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