Nov 16, 2020

Potato Focaccine

Potato focaccine is a version of an Italian snacking bread. Focaccines are mini focaccias, and can contain any typical focaccia ingredients and extras. 





The dough for these focaccine includes over a 35 percent potatoes to flour, which makes them less airy than most focaccia. They are soft and moist, and delicious for snacking. 

You actually cut the focaccine out from the dough with cookie cutters. which is kind of a fun technique. You will end up with just a few scraps, which you can roll up into roll or flatten to make another focaccine. 






For the flour, the orignal recipe calls for Italian 00 flour, which is a very finely ground flour often used for pizza. I used unbleached all purpose flour because I didn't have any 00 flour and it worked out well. 

In fact, you can typically substitute all purpose for double zero flour. The results will likely be just slightly chewier. 

You can add herbs like rosemary or thyme. I actually had some parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme growing in pots in our back patio. I get excited when they are all going strong at the same time, so I added a little bit of everything. 




Because the baking time for these focaccine is shorter than most breads, I moved them to the upper rack in the oven for the last five minutes of baking to add a little golden color. 

When you remove these from the oven, be sure to brush them with olive oil and sprinkle them with coarse sea salt while they are still warm. You can serve these while they are still warm. They are also great reheated in a toaster oven. 





You can also split these little breads widthwise and toast them for sandwiches or mini pizzas. 


How to make potato focaccine:

First, peel and cut up a 6 ounce russet potato and cover with water. Bring to a boil and cook until the potatoes are tender. Mash them and let them cool to lukewarm. If you like, you can use the potato water for the bread for even more moistness. 

Next, in the bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together the flour, salt, and yeast. Add the potatoes, water, oil, and herbs, and knead for 10 minutes. 

After that, let the dough rise until doubled, one to two hours. In the meantime, heat your oven to 400 degrees F with a rack in the middle and a rack on the upper third of the oven. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and lightly brush with olive oil. 

Spread the dough out into a rectangle about 1/2 inch thick on a floured surface, and cut it with a biscuit cutter or 2 1/2 inch to 3 inch cookie cutter into 10 to 12 rounds and place them onto the baking sheet and let them rise for about 30 minutes. 

Right before baking, brush them with olive oil and dimple them with your fingers. 

Finally, bake them for 25 to 30 minutes, moving them to the upper rack for the last five minutes. Brush with more olive oil and sprinkle with coarse sea salt. 







This month, the Bread Baking Babes are making potato focaccine and our host kitchen is Feeding My Enthusiasms. She found this recipe on My Pinch of Italy

After the recipe, be sure to check out everyone's version of this recipe. Each Bread Baking Babe usually gets pretty creative and makes each recipe her own. 





Potato Focaccine

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Potato Focaccine
Yield: 12 breads
Author: Karen Kerr
Potato focaccine is a version of an Italian snacking bread. Focaccines are mini focaccias, and can contain any typical focaccia ingredients and extras.

Ingredients

  • 5 1/2 to 6 ounce (150 grams) russet potato 
  • 400 grams all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 8 grams (2 1/4 teaspoons) yeast 
  • 200 grams lukewarm water
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing
  • About two teaspoons of chopped fresh herbs such as parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme. If you use only rosemary, use slightly less as it is stronger. 
  • Coarse sea salt for finishing

Instructions

  1. Peel and cut up the potato into 1 1/2 inch chunks and cover with unsalted water. Bring the pan to a boil and simmer until the potatoes are tender. Mash the potatoes  and let them cool to lukewarm. 
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together the flour, salt, and yeast. Add the cooked and mashed potatoes, water, oil, and herbs, and knead on medium low for 10 minutes.
  3. Place the dough into an oiled bowl, cover it with plastic wrap, and let the dough rise until doubled, one to two hours. While the dough is rising, heat your oven to 400 degrees F with a rack in the middle and a rack on the upper third of the oven. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and lightly brush the paper with olive oil.
  4. Spread the dough out into a rectangle about 1/2 inch thick on a floured surface, and cut it with a biscuit cutter or 2 1/2 inch to 3 inch cookie cutter and place each onto the baking sheet. Cover loosely with oiled plastic wrap and let rise for about 30 minutes.
  5. Right before baking, brush the breads with olive oil and dimple them with your fingers.
  6. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, moving them to the upper rack for the last five minutes. Brush with more olive oil and sprinkle with coarse sea salt while still hot.

Calories

230.01

Fat (grams)

3.90

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.57

Carbs (grams)

42.63

Fiber (grams)

3.00

Net carbs

39.63

Sugar (grams)

0.93

Protein (grams)

5.80

Sodium (milligrams)

237.64

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
bread, focaccia, focaccine
Bread
Italian
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Created using The Recipes Generator
The Bread Baking Babes' Focaccine

13 comments:

  1. A little bit of everything! That's perfect! Yes, I loved mine split and toasted too.
    Top rack! I even went so far as to give them 3 minutes under broil ... watching them like a hawk.!
    Just beautiful ... as always.

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  2. Beautiful focaccine! I love that you added all the herbs in the Simon and Garfunkel song about Scarborough Fair. Bet they are delicious! Thanks for cleaning up the recipe and for directions for making them with the stand mixer, too.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you. I was going to reference Simon and Garfunkel!

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  3. Love the combination of herbs! I ran out in the rain long enough to get 7 sage leaves and wish I had picked more now. The rosemary is further away, I may need to plant another in the little patio-side area. Me no like getting wet! LOL

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  4. How clever of you to use all those herbs - your focaccine look fabulous! And. I recognize that salt!!

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    Replies
    1. It is the best! Over the years, we have been given a number of finishing salts as presents, and this seemingly bottomless container of Camargue fleur de sel is our favourite.

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  5. Beautiful focaccine! How awesome that you used all of the herbs together. I love the shot of the herbs.

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  6. They look like they would make great sandwiches! Your herbs are lovely.

    ReplyDelete

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