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Sep 6, 2022

Maple Pecan Oat Bread

This maple pecan oat bread will be a tasty addition to your breakfast or brunch table. 

Maple Pecan Oat Bread slices in a bowl.


While this maple, pecan, and oat yeasted bread is baking, your house will smell amazing. 

Well, actually, any time you have a loaf of bread in the oven your house will smell amazing, but add some maple and pecans into the mix, and this bread takes it to another level. In fact, I just walked over to the loaf and inhaled one more time. Oh man! 

The crumb in this bread is soft and moist and the pecans and maple add so much flavor.... and toasting slices of this bread brings out the pecan and maple flavors even more. 

Maple Pecan Oat Bread Loaf on a rack.


I may have been guilty of picking out the freshly roasted pecan pieces that are peeking out of the top of the crust to snack on once this loaf emerged from the oven. 

Ingredients in this Maple Oat Bread:

Pantry Ingredients:

Water, unsalted butter, brown sugar, salt, and instant yeast. 

For the yeast, you can also use active dry yeast or osmotolerant yeast, which is another instant yeast meant for breads with a higher sugar content. The sugar content of this formula isn't overly high, so all three yeasts will work. 

Because I bake a lot of bread, I keep a pound of SAF Red and SAF Gold (which is osmotolerant) in my freezer. If you are purchasing yeast from the grocery store, a typical packet of yeast usually has about 2 1/4 teaspoons. 

Maple flavor bottle.


Additional Ingredients:

Pure Maple Syrup: You can use either grade A, or for a stronger flavor, grade B. I also added a quarter teaspoon of maple flavor. This ingredient is totally optional, but will add some extra oomph to the "maple-ness" of the bread. My bottle looks a little beat up because I keep it in the refrigerator between all of my hot sauces.... keeping it real. 

Flours: For the flours in the bread, I used bread flour (my favorite brand is King Arthur), whole wheat flour, and rolled oats that I whirred briefly in a food processor. 

You could also substitute maple sugar for the brown sugar for even more maple flavor. 

Pecans: I used pecan pieces that I left pretty chunky. I love the look of the pecans in the bread slices. You could also substitute walnuts. 

Maple Pecan Oat Bread dough in a dough rising bucket.


Recommended Equipment:

Along with a kitchen scale, which I preach about all of the time, I recommend using a dough rising bucket, or something that will show you when your dough has doubled. I love the Cambro buckets, and have several in all sizes (probably more than I need). These things are so handy! 

For baking the loaf, you will need a 9" by 5" loaf pan. Measure the top of the pan, not the base, to make sure it is the right size. This is typically a 1 1/4 pound loaf pan. My favorite brand is USA Pan. Leave it to me to have a pretty big collection of them. 

I kneaded this bread with my trusty Kitchen Aid 7-quart Pro (in bright candy apple red to boot), but you can knead this dough by hand or with a bread machine. 

To grind the rolled oats, I used my favorite mini food processor. You can also use a blender. If you have oat flour on hand, you can use that, but you might have to adjust the water based on the feel of the dough.

Maple Pecan Oat Bread on a cutting board.


Tips for Making This Oat and Maple Bread:

First, the timing of the rise time is totally variable. There are a lot of factors, including the heat, the humidity, and the strength of your yeast. 

The same goes for how much water to add to your dough. I had to add more than the recipe calls for, which I made a note of in the recipe. When you are working with bread dough, definitely go with feel and the dough's responsiveness, including the "finger dent test" (how you know when the loaf is ready for the oven). 

When it's warm and humid, the dough will rise faster, and when it's cold and dry, the dough will rise more slowly. 

Maple Pecan Oat Bread on a rack.


Enjoy this bread toasted and buttered. Add a little cinnamon sugar for extra deliciousness. 

If you have leftovers, slices would also be delicious as French toast or in bread pudding. 

If you want to get all decadent (and why not?), make or buy some maple butter (butter and maple whipped together), or maple cream (whipped maple syrup until it is like fudge) and spread it on this bread. 

If you really want to get decadent, layer this bread with ice cream and caramel and/or chocolate syrup and top it with whipped cream for dessert. 

Maple Pecan Oat Bread Slices on a cutting board.


While this step is optional, I brushed the top of the loaf with a mixture of melted butter and maple syrup right after baking. 


Welcome to the fourth annual #FallFlavors! We have 21 bloggers sharing over SIXTY recipes using fall ingredients like squash, apples, maple, pecans, and many more. Follow #FallFlavors to see all the delicious recipes on social media.

Tuesday #FallFlavor Recipes

  • Apple Cheddar Ebelskiver from A Kitchen Hoor's Adventures
  • Easy Pie Crust Cookies from Best Cookie Recipes
  • Maple Pecan Oat Bread from Karen's Kitchen Stories
  • Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage and Brown Butte from Jen Around the World
  • Follow the Favorite Fall Recipes Facebook group and follow the Favorite Fall Flavors Pinterest board for more fall inspiration!



    Maple Pecan Oat Bread slices in a bowl.



    Maple Pecan Oat Bread

    Maple Pecan Oat Bread
    Yield: 16 servings
    Author: Karen's Kitchen Stories
    Prep time: 20 MinCook time: 45 MinInactive time: 2 HourTotal time: 3 H & 5 M
    This maple pecan oat bread will be a tasty addition to your breakfast or brunch table.

    Ingredients

    • 255 grams (1 cup plus 2 tablespoons) water, plus more as needed
    • 39 grams (2 tablespoons) pure maple syrup
    • 57 grams (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, softened
    • 134 grams (1 1/2 cups) rolled oats - ground for 30 seconds in a food processor.
    • 142 grams (1 1/4 cups) whole wheat flour
    • 180 grams (1 1/2 cups) bread flour
    • 29 grams (3 tablespoons packed) light brown sugar or maple sugar
    • 1 1/4 teaspoon table salt
    • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon maple flavor (optional)
    • 2 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast (see notes in post)
    • 113 grams (113 grams) chopped pecans
    • 2 teaspoons melted butter plus 1 tablespoon maple syrup for brushing the baked loaf (optional)

    Instructions

    1. Add all of the dough ingredients to the bowl of a stand mixer. Mix on medium low for about 8 minutes, adjusting the flour and water as needed. The dough should be smooth and very slightly tacky but not sticky.
    2. Let the dough rise in a dough rising bucket, covered, for 1 to 2 1/2 hours, until doubled.
    3. Spray a 9 inch by 5 inch loaf pan with spray oil.
    4. Deflate the dough and press it out into a rectangle, about 7 inches by 12 inches. Roll the dough up like you might cinnamon rolls into a log, beginning with a short side. Seal the seam and tuck in the ends and place the log into the loaf pan.
    5. Cover the loaf with oiled plastic wrap and let rise until the loaf crests over the pan by about 1/2 inch, 45 to 90 minutes.
    6. Heat the oven to 350 degrees F. Bake the loaf for 45 minutes and it reaches an internal temperature of 190 degrees F, tenting with foil at about 30 minutes if it is over-browning.
    7. Brush the hot bread with a mixture of the melted butter and maple syrup (optional).
    8. Turn the loaf out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

    Nutrition Facts

    Calories

    202.16

    Fat (grams)

    9.07

    Sat. Fat (grams)

    2.45

    Carbs (grams)

    26.82

    Fiber (grams)

    3.25

    Net carbs

    23.57

    Sugar (grams)

    4.92

    Protein (grams)

    5.07

    Sodium (milligrams)

    185.65

    Cholesterol (grams)

    7.66
    maple, oats
    bread
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    Adapted with a few changes from a King Arthur Flour recipe by Charlotte Rutledge. Be sure to browse their recipes and shop their products. They are an amazing organization. I am not an affiliate. 

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    1. Wow, just wow... delicious recipe loaded with flavor.

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    2. This is kind of bread I purchase from bakeries and just love. Can't wait to make my own at home.

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