Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Chinese Cuban Fried Rice | Wok Wednesdays

Chinese Cuban Fried Rice

According to Grace Young, the author of Stir Frying to the Sky's Edge, there are many Chinese Cuban restaurants in New York City. In one restaurant she describes, the waiters all speak perfect Chinese, Spanish, and English. That is pretty cool.

Maybe these restaurants are the inspiration for the Korean Mexican fusion food trucks we have here in Los Angeles (well... probably not).

Chinese Cuban Fried Rice | Wok Wednesdays

This rice dish is very simple, only containing a few ingredients. The rice gets its flavor and color from dark soy sauce, which is not typical of Chinese fried rice. There was no mincing garlic or ginger, and no rice wine required, just a few ingredients to make an amazingly delicious rice dish.


Onions, bay shrimp, scallions, salt, oil, dark soy, and long grain rice made the day before are all you need.

Oh right. And bean sprouts. That's when I found out about the great bean sprout ban. Uh oh.

Not wanting to spend my Sunday hunting down bean sprouts, and not having enough time to grow my own, I decided to try pea sprouts that I found at a local organic market instead. They are crunchy like bean sprouts, and taste a lot like them. (P.S. I've since found out on the Interwebs that any sprouts can be problematic, so I don't understand why bean sprouts were singled out.) While they may not have produced the results that Grace had in mind, we loved the rice, and fought over the leftovers in this house (I won).

The biggest hassle to making this recipe, beside the sprouts, is that you have to make your rice a day in advance. Just do it. You will love this rice.

This recipe can be found on page 264 of Grace Young's Stir Frying to the Sky's Edge.

If you'd like to Wok along, check out the Wok Wednesday's blog page and Facebook page, both created and watched over by Matthew Lardie. It's a great group, and we are coached along by Grace Young Herself!
Chinese Cuban Fried Rice

4 comments:

  1. Cuban Chinese? And a simple recipe? I'm doubly intrigued!

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    Replies
    1. It's really good. The book is amazing with all of the recipes from the Chinese diaspora.

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  2. Nice shot of your mise en place. ;) I was expecting to use some type of spice (adobo/paprika) for this to be "Cuban", not just dark soy. It's amazing that so few ingredients can taste so good. Lovely pictures as always.

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I love comments and questions and read every one of them.