Mar 9, 2015

Multigrain and Seed Bread Extraordinaire | #BreadBakers

Multigrain and Seed Bread Extraordinaire

This Multigrain and Seed Bread Extraordinaire is a variation of one of my all time favorite breads. The dough is great for rolls, traditional sandwich loaves, and boules. It starts with a cornmeal, oats, wheat bran, flax meal, and flax seed soaker that you mix the day before. 

Prior to baking, the top of the loaf is generously sprinkled with lots and lots of poppy seeds. 

Oh, and a half a cup of cooked wild rice is kneaded into the dough. Isn't it gorgeous in that lacy bread? 

Multigrain and Seed Bread Extraordinaire

This is a hearty bread that is wonderful buttered, toasted and buttered, and my favorite way, toasted with a sunny side up egg on top for breakfast. I like to break the yolk and spread it over the bread. I like lots of pepper too... the slice underneath has butter on it....

Multigrain and Seed Bread Extraordinaire

Back to the bread.... even though my hobby is trying new bread techniques and recipes, I always seem to come back to a variation of this bread. This time the recipe was inspired by combining the different techniques from four of Peter Reinhart's bread books.

In every bread book he has published, Peter Reinhart has included a formula for Struan, which he also calls Multigrain Bread Extraordinaire. In each book, the formula is slightly different. I pulled out my copies of Artisan Breads Everyday, The Bread Baker's ApprenticeWhole Grain Breads, and Crust and Crumb.I played around with the recipe and baked this loaf.

I LOVE how this turned out, especially the addition of the flax seeds, the extra sourdough starter (if you don't have any starter, that's okay, you can still make this bread), and the extra wild rice. This is a bread that you can play with and make your own. The bread stays fresh for days. You can also slice it, freeze it, and then pull out slices to toast for breakfast. Play with it and let me know your variation!!

Multigrain and Seed Bread Extraordinaire

Other Struan breads I've previously posted here include Struan: A Multigrain Bread and Multigrain Bread Extraordinaire.

After the recipe, check out the 21 (that's twenty-one!) amazing bread recipes using seeds from the #BreadBakers.

Multigrain and Seed Bread Extraordinaire

Ingredients

Soaker

1 ounce (3 Tbsp) coarse grind cornmeal (polenta)
3/4 ounces (3 Tbsp) rolled oats
.25 ounces (2 Tbsp) wheat bran
.25 ounces (2 Tbsp) whole flax seeds
.25 ounces (1 T) ground flax seeds
2 1/2 ounces water

Final Dough

13.5 ounces unbleached high gluten or bread flour, plus extra if needed
1.5 ounces (3 Tbsp) brown sugar
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp instant yeast
All of the soaker
3 ounces (about 1/2 C) cooked wild rice
1 1/2 Tbsp honey
1/2 C buttermilk (or milk)
4 ounces (by weight) of sourdough starter, fed or not fed (optional)
6 ounces (3/4 C) water
Lots of poppy seeds (for topping)

Instructions

  1. The day before baking the bread, mix the soaker ingredients in a small bowl, and cover with plastic wrap. Let sit overnight at room temperature.
  2. Whisk all of the dry ingredients, except the poppy seeds, in the bowl of stand mixer. 
  3. Add the soaker, rice, honey, buttermilk, starter, and water, and mix by hand with the dough hook until all of the flour is moistened. Scrape the bowl with a bowl scraper, and attach the bowl to the mixer. 
  4. Knead with the dough hook on low for about two minutes, adding more flour by tablespoon, until the dough is tacky, but not too sticky. Don't add too much flour... just enough. 
  5. Knead the dough on medium low for about 6 to 8 minutes. 
  6. Turn the dough out onto lightly floured work surface, and knead a few times by hand. 
  7. Place the dough into an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise until doubled, about 90 minutes. 
  8. Flatten the dough on the counter, and roll into a loaf. Place it into an oiled 9 by 5 inch loaf pan. 
  9. Sprinkle the top of the loaf generously with poppy seeds, and cover with oiled plastic wrap or a towel. 
  10. Let rise for 60 to 90 minutes, until the dough his crested about 1 to 1 1/2 inches above the top of the pan. 
  11. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Bake for 20 minutes, reverse the pan, and bake for another 15 to 20 minutes, until the interior registers 185 to 190 degrees F. 
  12. Remove the loaf from the pan and cool completely on a wire rack. 

BreadBakers



#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. This month's theme is Seeds, and is hosted by Karen of Karen's Kitchen Stories (I know her!). Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient. If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com Don't forget to check out the rest of the delicious breads with seeds:

37 comments:

  1. I love this Karen!! There's a lot going on with this extraordinary bread between the soaker and the dough. I made a bread a couple summers ago that had rice in it, and it was amazing. I was also lucky enough to be in a writing class a couple years ago with Peter. What a really nice guy, and his knowledge of breads is amazing.

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  2. You make the most droolworthy! Killing me with this one. Its so tasty and delicious!!

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  3. Extraordinaire is so fitting with this bread. It's simply beautiful and I can imagine it tastes just as wonderful as it looks.
    Thanks so much for hosting Bread Bakers this month. I'm really enjoying the seeds theme.

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    1. Thanks Renee! Seeing all of the seeded breads makes me smile.

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  4. I've never thought of adding wild rice but, why not? The more seeds, the better, right? This is a gorgeous loaf, Karen, both outside and inside! Thanks for hosting this great theme!

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    1. Thanks so much for this group! And for creating the updated list =)

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  5. I have been meaning to make a bread with cooked rice for a while, this might be the one that I have to use! I haven't made a traditionally shaped sandwich loaf in forever but seeing your pictures makes me want one now!

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    1. Neither have I, but this bread is so good. You could always shape it as a boule.

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  6. What's not to love? This bread looks amazing!

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  7. Gosh, there is a lot going on in this bread and it all works together. Rice, seeds, starters-- you used all sorts of technique to make the finished product and it lives up to its extraordinaire name! Thanks for leading us this month and taking the time to update links-- 21, that is a lot of bread!!

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    1. Thanks Holly. That first list was crazy!!

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  8. I will bet this tasted fantastic toasted Great Job.

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  9. love all the goodness packed into this bread - and such a perfect holey texture

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  10. I love the addition of wild rice in this recipe!

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  11. We made Struan in my bakery class in culinary school last semester, also a variation of Peter Reinhart's recipe. Such a perfect sandwich bread! It was one of the most popular breads in our bakery. Yours looks wonderful!!

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    1. Thanks Sophia! It is fun to play with and Peter has created so many variations.

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  12. There is a thing called bread envy and I have that going on right now. Gorgeous Bread and wonderful technique.

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  13. What a gorgeous bread Karen! It is so full of delicious "stuff," including a few surprises. I'm not much of a bread baker, but you're making me want to "start my starter:)"

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  14. What a fantastic looking loaf. Especially love the fried egg on the slice!

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    1. Oh I'm so glad. I almost didn't post that photo!!

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  15. Karen, the bread is amazing, look at that crumb and all the wild rice peeking to say hello! But the way you enjoyed it, with the fried egg and the runny yolk does it all for me, my favorite type of lunch actually. Lots of black pepper, mandatory!

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    1. Lots of pepper, right? Yay! Thanks Sally!

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  16. Karen, what a delicious looking loaf! I love the addition of wild rice. I've added quinoa to my breads, but I'll have to try rice. Fantastic. Thanks for sharing with #BreadBakers.

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    1. I've added quinoa too, but the wild rice does not get mangled in the dough. It stands on its own, which is really cool. You can also cook it and freeze it to add it to bread later.

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  17. Your photos are gorgeous! I can't wait to try a loaf of this bread.

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    1. Thanks Heather! I hope you do! It's definitely one of my "go to" breads.

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  18. Karen, your bread looks stunning! Love the crust! It looks so healthy and delicious that it would make for a hearty Sunday (or Friday in my case) morning breakfast!!

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    1. Thanks Shireen. It's one of the few breads where one slice is totally enough.

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  19. Really gorgeous loaf! I've seen the Struan recipe in Artisan Breads Everyday but keep skipping over it. You have definitely given me the push to finally try it.

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I love comments and questions and read every one of them.