Nov 25, 2020

No Knead Rye Bread

This no knead rye bread is a great way to try your hand at baking with rye. It can be a tricky flour to work with, but this no knead recipe for rye bread is easy. 

Easy no knead rye bread




This bread is hearty and delicious, but still light enough for sandwiches. You can make this bread with or without caraway seeds, which give this bread a more "deli rye" flavor. 

If you skip the caraway seeds, this bread tastes similar to no knead whole wheat bread, but slightly more "sour." In addition, rye flour has less gluten than wheat flour, and behaves very differently. It can get super sticky with too much handling, and usually needs to be combined with bread flour or high gluten flour. 

That's what's so nice about the no knead method when it comes to rye. Because you don't knead the dough beyond just combining the ingredients, the rye doesn't have a chance to get too sticky. 

No Knead rye bread




To change things up, I sprinkled the the proofing bowl with a little bit of coarse cornmeal for an extra crunchy crust. 


Ingredients you will need:

Bread flour.

Dark rye flour or pumpernickel flour. Pumpernickel flour is unsifted and has a stronger flavor, while dark rye flour has a small amount of the bran and germ sifted out. I used dark rye flour. 

Beer - light American-style lager to help develop a yeasty flavor. 

Vinegar - to add a little tang. 

Caraway seeds

Instant yeast - just a small amount. 

Salt and water. 



No knead rye



To make this loaf, just stir together all of the ingredients in a bowl, cover, and let sit overnight. The next morning, shape the loaf and place it in a 7 inch banneton or cloth lined bowl and let rise for about 1 1/2 hours. 

If you place the shaped loaf into the banneton seam side down, the top of the loaf will naturally crack open during baking after you've flipped it over before baking. I used a knife to give it a little slash just to make sure the loaf would rise up. 

Bake the loaf in a preheated Dutch oven, removing the lid halfway through. I like to move the loaf to a baking sheet at that time so the bottom doesn't burn. 

No Knead rye bread crumb





Enjoy this bread with butter, for sandwiches, and toast. It's also wonderful topped with avocado or fried eggs. Use your imagination! 

If you think you don't like rye bread, try this recipe without the caraway seeds. You might be surprised. What you think you don't like are the caraway seeds, not the rye.

This is an updated post. I originally posted this bread in January of 2013. I've taken new photos and added a printable recipe card. It was great to revisit this bread. 



No Knead rye bread slices





No Knead Rye Bread

Print
No Knead Rye Bread
Yield: 16 servings
Author: Karen Kerr
This no knead rye bread is a great way to try your hand at baking with rye. It can be a tricky flour to work with, but this no knead recipe for rye bread is easy.

Ingredients

  • 10 ounces (2 cups) unbleached all purpose flour
  • 5 ounces (scant 1 cup) dark rye flour
  • 2 T caraway seeds (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp instant yeast
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 7 ounces (3/4 cups plus two tablespoons) of room temperature water
  • 3 ounces (6 tablespoons) lager beer
  • 1 T white wine vinegar

Instructions

  1. Mix all of the ingredients in a large glass bowl until combined. There is no need to over mix.
  2. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it sit at room temperature for 8 to 18 hours.
  3. Spray a 7 to 9 inch banneton, brotform, or tea towel lined bowl with spray oil and generously sprinkle it with rice flour.
  4. Scrape the dough out onto a flour dusted surface and lightly knead the dough about 15 times.
  5. Shape the dough into a ball by pulling the sides up to the top/middle, pinching the edges together. Flip it over and use a dough scraper or bench knife to tighten the dough by slightly scooting the ball over the work surface from all sides. 
  6. Place the dough, seam side down, into the basket/bowl, lightly spray the top of the loaf with spray oil, and cover with plastic wrap.
  7. Let the dough rise until doubled, about 1 1/2 to two hours.
  8. Place a cast iron pot or Dutch oven in your oven and preheat it to 500 degrees F.
  9. When the dough is doubled, remove the pot from the oven and carefully remove the top. Top the dough with a piece of parchment paper an a plate. Flip the plate and bowl over and lift the dough, parchment and all, into the hot pan. 
  10. Cover the pot and place it into the oven.
  11. Reduce the oven temperature to 425 degrees F and bake for 20 minutes. Remove the lid and continue baking for another 20 minutes or so, until the loaf reaches 205 degrees F and is browned on top.
  12. Remove the bread from the pot and allow it to cool on a wire rack. Be patient. This could take about two hours.

Calories

98.84

Fat (grams)

0.50

Sat. Fat (grams)

0.06

Carbs (grams)

20.24

Fiber (grams)

2.92

Net carbs

17.32

Sugar (grams)

0.26

Protein (grams)

3.46

Sodium (milligrams)

219.48

Cholesterol (grams)

0.00
bread, rye, no knead
Bread
American
Did you make this recipe?
Tag @karenskitchenstories.com on instagram and hashtag it #karenskitchenstories
Created using The Recipes Generator
Recipe adapted from Cook's Illustrated Magazine, 2008.

28 comments:

  1. This bread looks delicious! Has a crispy crust,just how I like it! Greetings!

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  2. Hello, just browsing through your excellent blog. I've wanted to try rye bread for a while, plus an excuse to buy a cast iron pot!

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    Replies
    1. There's always a good reason to buy a new pot! I love this one for baking bread. This is the one recommended by Chad Robertson of Tartine fame.

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  3. Hi,

    Are the caraway seeds whole or ground please?

    Thanks,
    Mixi

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  4. Hi, is it a must to add Lager beer? I do not have it on hand.
    Thank you

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    Replies
    1. Hi soh, I'm not sure. The beer adds a yeasty flavor, so maybe some more water and some barley malt syrup? I'm not sure.

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  5. Flour ounces by weight or volume?

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    Replies
    1. By weight. Even the liquid is by weight.

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    2. Dangit! Assumed it was volume ... We will see how the bread turns out 😥

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    3. Well the liquid should be right but the dough should be very wet. It' might just turn out fine!

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  6. No salt is needed ??

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the catch! I updated the recipe.

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  7. Do you have a video or pictures that show(s) the flip into the Dutch oven and then how to get the bread out of the Dutch oven onto the baking sheet halfway thru the baking time?

    I'm not "seeing" how to make that happen without tearing the half-baked bread and losing the rise?

    We love rye bread so I would really love to try this!

    Thanks so much - Happy Thanksgiving!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy Thanksgiving! I don't have a video but I have photos. Go to the Bread 101 tab and click on the first post "How to Transfer Bread Dough to a Hot Cast Iron Dutch Oven." https://www.karenskitchenstories.com/2015/05/how-to-transfer-bread-dough-to-hot-cast.html I hope that is helpful! Regarding removing it halfway through, I try to grab the paper, but if it tears, I just use potholders. The crust is pretty crisp at that point.

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  8. I don't think that I've ever used rye flour...something to put on my list of must-do's for 2021!!!

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    Replies
    1. It takes some getting used to, but it adds a nice flavor.

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  9. Gorgeous loaf of rye! I love no knead breads, so easy!

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  10. This is a beautiful loaf of bread. I am going to try rye this winter and definitely include the caraway (I love caraway).

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  11. So happy to see this, hubs grabbed rye flour by mistake and I've been wondering what to make with it!

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    Replies
    1. This would be a great way to use the flour. I also have some rye chocolate cookies on the blog.

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  12. I had no idea making rye bread could be this easy! We loved it with our Reuben sandwiches yesterday! Great recipe!

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  13. I really want to make this! We love rye. I am wondering though, can I replace the beer and the 1/4 tsp of yeast with one packet of yeast and get the same results? We don't drink alcohol, or cook with it.

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I would love to hear from you!